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Roof Survey

Roofs can one of the more challenging structures to survey, often requiring scaffolding and posing health and safety hazards in order to product a quality survey.

Recently, Landform Surveys worked with Mosedale Gillatt Architects on a roof survey for a historic hall in North Tyneside. Mosedale Gillatt Architects were commissioning the survey to get data that they can base their designs for a new roof on.

This was a survey that combined topographic survey, laser scanning and drone surveys for the more inaccessible areas. As our clients need the survey in order to produce designs for further work, this combination allowed us to produce the most comprehensive survey possible. The topographic survey was used to help establish the levels and falls of drainage gullies and roof openings. We used the laser scan to produce a 3D model of the current structure and the drone survey helped to produce aerial imagery so that the condition of the roof could be evaluated in areas that were inaccessible to us.

As one of the buildings had an incomplete roof, getting the details of the existing roof was important so that the architects had accurate data to base their designs on.

With it being a historic building, it was important to identify any inconsistencies or structural anomalies which would need to be taken into account in the design process. To limit further damage to the roof, we were able to employ the use of a drone to get aerial footage. These images will allow the architects to determine the condition of the existing roof. We delivered our laser scan data alongside HD photography and video footage so the architects had a permanent record of the roofs condition.

Eric Hinds, director of Landform Surveys says: “This was an interesting survey, combining laser scanning, conventional topographic survey, and drone surveying, on one of the regions most historic buildings. A pleasure to be involved.”

We look forward to seeing the new roof designs once they are complete.